Swiss Bliss
Well, while the Paradox and I flew into Zurich, we actually went somewhere about 90 minutes away.  I don’t even remember the name of the town or even the restaurant, but I do remember the story.  The Surgeon lives in Zurich, and he is an avid collector and wine enthusiast.  There was a place with a great wine list he knew, and it was going out of business.  There were many wines on the list that were undervalued, and surely they would be interested in selling.  There was only one thing left to do, go and have dinner for some “quality control,” of course. 
Bye Bye Sylt
Bye Bye Sylt 
The Ambassador Told Me He Missed Me
The Ambassador Told Me He Missed Me 
Lost in Switzerland
Lost in Switzerland 
The restaurant was really in the middle of nowhere.  We were lucky to get a cab to come get us later, in fact.  I had previously gotten a copy of the wine list in advance, and I was excited.  There were lots of great deals, and I carefully curated a delicious dinner accordingly.  And there was one crown jewel on the list, a 1923 Liger-Belair La Tache, for about 2500 Euros nonetheless.  This was worth the entire journey just to taste that incredible bottle one more time! The party was still going in Sylt, and the Ambassador was sharing with me all the great wines they were drinking, but I had my own plans.   
There She Is
There She Is
I’ll Pay You Double
I’ll Pay You Double 
Looking Good And Old
Looking Good And Old 
As soon as we arrived, though, the story started to change.  The list on the website was outdated and not updated.  Some bottles were not for sale.  And the restaurant wasn’t going out of business, it was just closing for winter season, which it does every year.  Doh!  Let’s just say that wasn’t the greatest lead I have ever gotten lol.  But there was the bottle, the holy grail I had traveled to see, the 1923 La Tache.  I had it in my hands, Dr. Jones.  The owner then proceeded to tell me the bottle was already reserved for a client.  Reserved?  Impossible, who reserves a bottle, why didn’t he drink it already?  Did he pay for it?  No?  Ok, he doesn’t really want it, I’ll pay you double.  No?  Come on!
So I came up with the only sensible offer I had left.  I would pay the same price for the bottle and share it with his client.  That was super fair for everyone.  Who was this guy, anyway?  Well it turns out, it was Olivier Zind Humbrecht!  Olivier, call me.  Don’t drink that bottle without me, I know where to find you!!!  So my fingers are crossed, and I await a possible Spring session with Mr. Zind Humbrecht.
Well, we came all this way, so we sat down to drink and be merry.  We started with a 1962 Dom Perignon, which was a deliciously mature bottle, full of mushroom, sous bois, brown sugar and dry caramelly goodness.  There was a touch of cream soda and a perfect petillance that came out on its finish (95).
The 1990 Cristal showed off all its classic, zippy butterscotch goodness.  This is a great bottle of Cristal to enjoy at the moment, and along with the 1996 the youngest I would recommend drinking at the moment, unless you’re in a nightclub lol (95+).
Next up was a bottle of 1973 Domaine de la Romanée Conti Montrachet.  The fill was a little low and the color on the deeper/golder side, but at 1100 Euros, I couldn’t resist.  The bottle delivered a great experience, even greater than the ‘technically’ better bottle at this year’s DRC Montrachet vertical back in May.  This was full of honey and that classic DRC botrytis edge.  The wine was regally rich and deliciously decadent with some wheaty goodness.  It dried a bit in the glass, but it was still delicious from this great vintage for white Burgs.  It was fully mature with some corn kisses on its finish.  The Surgeon thought there was ‘still meat on the bones’ and JoJo tasted ‘nuts…like an old DP’ (96).
It was a special occasion to have an old, rare bottle of white Bordeaux like 1977 Chateau Haut Brion Blanc.  I often find these weird, forgotten, ‘off’ vintages as interesting to try as the greatest of vintages.  One, you might never see one again, and two, they often outpunch their weight class and over deliver.  I think it was 200 Euros on the list.  The nose of the ‘77 had an incredible intensity with nice sweetness and some Chardonnay gravity, even though there was no Chardonnay in it.  JoJo found ‘apricots,’ and I saw straw and sweet soda in this tender and pleasant wine (91).
Bubbles
Bubbles
Corks
Corks
Big Time Bordeaux
Big Time Bordeaux 
There was a great nose to the 1952 Chateau Cheval Blanc with its pencil dust, iron, gravel, charcoal and plummy fruit.  The Bordeaux were served semi-blind, by the way, as in we knew what they were but not the order.  There were great minerals here in this rich and decadent red with loads of deep dark chocolate and coconut.  There was a creaminess and tenderness, but the finish hit with a bang zoom.  I was convinced it was the ‘75 La Miss, but NO lol (97).
The 1975 Chateau La Mission Haut-Brion was, as usual, deep and dark and foresty.  There was more chocolate like the previous wine, but that’s where they parted ways.  This had redder fruit, more perfume and great sauvage, with drier flavors.  I have had bottles that have hit one note higher, but it was still damn good.  It was a little stonier than other experiences (97).
The 1955 Chateau Mouton-Rothschild was full of ‘menthol’ per The Paradox.  This had sexy, minty, coconutty and caramel-y flavors with kisses of whey and wheat.  The Surgeon found ‘black chocolate,’ and I thought it was the Cheval for sure.  There was all this sexy grit to it.  The Mouton made the Surgeon share, ‘My father told me, you don’t need a lot of friends, but make sure you have three: a doctor, a lawyer, and a WINE DEALER.’ This is certainly great advice (97).  
Volnay Rules The Day
Volnay Rules The Day
The Happy Recap
The Happy Recap
Time To Go
Time To Go 
We migrated to Burgundy where a 1966 Michel Lafarge Volnay 1er Clos des Chenes was a superb treat, especially at 150 Euros.  The color was so light and so pale I thought the bottle might not be good, but it was divine.  It was so pure with exemplary elegance and fine flesh.  It had dancing acidity which made it super tasty like a lovely, candy apple treat.  Gorgeous and very memorable (96).
A rarely seen 1978 Grivot Clos Vougeot showed its deep and dark Clos Vougeot terroir, full of rusty iron but a bit one dimensional after the Lafarge (93).
We took another visit to Clos Vougeot with a 1985 Gros Frère et Soeur Clos Vougeot, which was strangely reminiscent of apricot liqueur.  This was a simple and medicinal wine.  I didn’t like it (85).
We hit the Champagne reset button and out came a 1971 Dom Perignon.  There were white sugar, caramel and cream aromas on the nose with a delicate spritz.  This was a bit lighter than I expected and the finish showed just a little tired, which was the bottle more than anything else (93A).
There was one last bottle, a 1968 Chateau La Mission Haut Brion half-bottle that was smooth, soft and tender.  It was a 15 minute wine that declined quite quickly, as very old, lesser vintages are prone to do (88H).
It was another magnificent night out in Europe, despite the misinformation.  As long as the intentions are good, and the wine is great, it will always be a happy ending.  It was a long way home, and we had one more rendezvous with the Mogul and Jetski the next night before this trip was over…

FIN 

JK