Sylt
So on one of these jaunts to Europe, the Mogul had the great idea to get a private plane for the six of us, as we were hopping around for four days all over, including two flights in one day etc.  It was relatively reasonable actually, somewhere north of 5k per person for the five flights.  But wait, I asked the Mogul, I will only be on some of the legs of this trip since I had a different agenda for half the trip, shouldn’t I only pay half or so?  “Don’t be so cheap,” barked the Mogul.  And that is how the Mogul stays the Mogul lol.  
Sylt
Sylt
The-Beach-on-Sylt
The Beach on Sylt  
No Sissy French Poodles Allowed Lol
No Sissy French Poodles Allowed Lol 
So from Paris we headed south for lunch, and the French Paradox and I separated from our group for a meeting elsewhere, then we reconnected and headed north, very north to the north of Germany, in fact.  There is an island north of Germany called Sylt, which is basically the Hamptons of Germany.  It is a beautiful place and a great place to visit and truly vacation, especially if you like freezing ocean water and warm weather two weeks a year.  Just kidding all my Sylt loving German friends!!!  
I do love Sylt, and if you do happen to go to Sylt, you must have dinner at Restaurant Jorg Muller.  Herr Big Ben presides over the wine cellar with great enthusiasm, knowledge and service, and Jorg’s classic, old school cooking is a trip down memory lane regarding those of you who have been dining in Europe for decades.  Ok enough about the food and service, let’s get to the wines.
Caviar Finished
Caviar Finished 
Montrachet Magic
Montrachet Magic 
A Quintessential Quartet
A Quintessential Quartet
We began with a rare 1961 Krug Collection that was fresh and zippy with vanilla, cream and sugar aromas on its nose.  This was tasty stuff despite a slight ‘dusty’ note found by the Paradox.  This was almost like drinking an egg cream, with a touch of wheat and corn flavors on top of fresh caramel ones (96).
Though the Ambassador was not initially thrilled with the 1990 Domaine Ramonet Montrachet magnum, I was completely enthralled.  Its nose was full of corn and mint with touches of floral and herbal goodness.  There was almost a bit of Chartreuse to it.  On the palate, there were rich corn, honey and brown sugar flavors with great intensity and gamy fruit, which was not a bad thing for this example.  I loved it, with all its honey and flesh.  Don’t hesitate to drink up this vintage of Ramonet right now (97M).
The next wine was a 1993 Domaine Leflaive Montrachet.  I think I equaled my total bottles of Leflaive Montrachet consumed in my life on this trip!  This was ‘deep with layers of flavors’ per Jetski and had more strength and structure than the Ramonet.  This was like like a SuperMonty lol.  There were deep yellow fruits, corn, rich flesh and a tiny touch of rainwater rounding out this decadent wine.  The acidity and length were in all the right places (97+).
We moved on to Bordeaux and a rare 1943 Chateau Mouton Rothschild.  This older claret softly spoke with savory, old library notes.  The Mogul noted that it was ‘a little sour,’ but this was just a tender, soft, easy and pleasant wine from a not so fabulous vintage made under difficult circumstances as well.  It was just hanging on to being interesting (90).
The 1949 Chateau Cheval Blanc had a deep, dark and perfect nose, with loads of black fruit underneath a deep, red, sexy musk.  There was a rich, decadent, fleshy wine under this exotic,  coconutty goodness.  There were complicated and delicious flavors of soil, blackberry, tobacco and old book.  This was a ‘rock star’ bottle (98).
The 1959 Chateau Mouton-Rothschild had the classic mint and eucalyptus to it, with a lot of red fruit and rubber.  There was a chalky note that provided some lift to the stony and strong finish, but it was a mortal experience for this wine, which can be more epic (95).
We closed out this spectacular flight of Bordeaux with a gorgeously gravelly bottle of 1961 Chateau La Mission Haut Brion.  This had an insane concentration, making it a true wow wine.  Everything one would want in this wine was there.  Its rich purple fruit and smoky nuances were enough to keep a smile on my face all night long (98).
So there is a guy named Klaus Peter Keller, and he makes Riesling.  Many of you are familiar with him and his wines, and many of you probably aren’t.  You should be.  Over the past two decades, there has been a winemaking revolution in Germany and Riesling, led by Klaus.  The wines are being made with higher alcohol levels (like standard 12-13%) and in a drier, less sweeter style.  The wines made in this style are often called ‘GG’ or ‘Gross Gewachs.’  Truth be told, I drink these wines at home all the time, because the price to quality ratio is quite extraordinary, and I highly recommend these ‘GG’ wines in general, and especially the ones from Keller.
Here Big Ben and Absterde on the Move
Here Big Ben and Absterde on the Move 
Spectacular Bottle
Spectacular Bottle 
There’s Some Pasta in Here I Swear
There’s Some Pasta in Here I Swear 
Keller doesn’t put ‘GG’ on his label, but he does pay respect to all his terroirs by naming the wines after the vineyards, just as they do in Burgundy.  So Klaus was actually there at Jorg Muller, celebrating the birthday of a friend.  I sent him a glass of Ramonet, and he sent me a glass back of 2011 Keller Riesling Absterde out of Jeroboam.  Absterde happens to be one of his best terroirs/wines, and I have never seen a Jero of his wine anywhere.  Now I know why lol.  This was packed with minerals and petrol in an incredibly taut, large package.  The fruit was full of white peaches, lychees and tangy citrus.  I love these wines (96J)!
We had to have at least one bottle of Red Burgundy, otherwise we might be accused of catching some sort of strange European fever and risk not being let back into America.  So we opened a 1990 Meo-Camuzet Richebourg off the list.  There was spectacular purple fruit on this seemingly perfect bottle.  This hit all the decadent, dark forest floor notes with the full spectrum of the spice wheel.  This was a meaty, chewy and delicious Meo, making up for the lackluster showing of this cuvee on Jayer Night earlier this year (98).
There was talk of a rally to go somewhere else for a nightcap, but it stalled outside, so the Paradox and I stumbled back to our rooms, as lunch was already less than twelve hours away, and we were leaving our friends right after lunch.
Wait
Wait
For
For 
IT
IT
There was only one wine that mattered for lunch, the crown jewel of our entire trip, a jeroboam of 1992 Ramonet Montrachet. This was a perfect bottle.  Its color glittered in sunlight like a small fortune.  Its nose was full of a sexy corn/butter glaze with a touch of signature mint.  It had that wintry, icy character that was in perfect balance with great spice, black forest and great minerality.  This had none of the 1992 over-ripeness from which many whites of this vintage can suffer.  It was still tight, but it continued to open and was in a really good spot after my fourth glass of it .  There was true grit and expensive earth on its finish.  It was nice to see that even out of Jeroboam, the 1992 Ramonet Montrachet is still one of the greatest white wines ever made (99J).
The French Paradox and I excused ourselves, as we were off to Zurich.  There would be no meetings with any bankers, just dinner with the Surgeon, and a lead on a great collection that we just had to check out.
Happy Recap
The Happy Recap

FIN 

JK